Taking advantage of the community garden. Swiss Chard



John Corso and some other diligent members of the 250 Davenport Community have launched Phase II of the community garden. Phase I last year was really successful, but concentrated solely on various sorts of tomatoes, many of which I had never known to exist prior to then, and each with it’s own subtle texture, colour and taste.

This year the garden has expanded to include radishes, squash, corn, potatoes, peppers, onions, herbs, and many others including Swiss Chard, which I have often seen at the grocers but have had no real interest, due to my limited budget.

However, because the community garden is designed specifically towards benefiting those of us at the lower end of the income scale by allowing us access to a source of vegetables and fruit which we may not have been able to afford otherwise, I decided to take the opportunity and try it out.

So I Googled the veggie and found a simple recipe. Tried it twice now, and I’ve really enjoyed it but I must warn you however about the methane problem that may follow up later on after the meal has settled.

Swiss Chard

Ingredients
  • 1 large bunch of fresh Swiss chard
  • 1 small clove garlic, sliced
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • Pinch of dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 teaspoon butter
  • Salt
Method

1 Rinse out the Swiss chard leaves thoroughly. Remove the toughest third of the stalk, discard or save for another recipe (such as this Swiss chard ribs with cream and pasta). Roughly chop the leaves into inch-wide strips.

2 Heat a saucepan on a medium heat setting, add olive oil, a few small slices of garlic and the crushed red pepper. Sauté for about a minute. Add the chopped Swiss chard leaves. Cover. Check after about 5 minutes. If it looks dry, add a couple tablespoons of water. Flip the leaves over in the pan, so that what was on the bottom, is now on the top. Cover again. Check for doneness after another 5 minutes (remove a piece and taste it). Add salt to taste, and a small amount of butter. Remove the Swiss chard to a serving dish.

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