Vintage Toronto Ads: Boosting Your Sox Appeal


Posted in the toronto(ist) by Jamie Bradburn on April 20, 2010 3:00 PM

20100420garter.jpg
Source: The Toronto Star, July 6, 1928.

Today’s ad proves that, while technology has relegated men’s garters to an aesthetic fashion decision from their one-time general usage, a bad pun is timeless.
Manufacturer Albert Stein & Company, in numerous ads during the early part of the twentieth century, boasted that “no metal can touch you” when you wore their garters. Comfort was always stressed to attract dubious fellows like today’s sad case; an ad from 1910 noted that “the fit is snug without shutting off blood circulation or furrowing the flesh.” Paris Garters were also touted as a great Christmas gift, as a 1939 ad for a boxed set illustrated:

He doubly appreciates receiving Paris from YOU. First he prefers Paris for its style, its quality and its utility. Second, and this is very important—he’s proud you’ve chosen THE BEST for him…Remember, Paris is priced no higher than imitations, but is always higher in quality than in price.

We suspect that our careless friend might not have had enough “sox appeal” to be on the receiving end of a gift that could have altered his destiny. He sat in his chair for several hours and pondered if it was simply sock issues that were his obstacle to dominance in the business world. Nobody seemed put off by his halitosis or the clucking noise he made when nervous or stressed. After taking stock of his situation, and determining that only eighty-seven different emotions seized him at any one time, he decided to launch a manufacturing firm dedicated to eliminating the scourge of sock droop from lazy dressers like him.
Additional material from the May 1910 edition of The Fra and the December 11, 1939 edition of Life.

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