Stop The Meter

The CRTC just decided to let your Internet Service Provider put a meter on your Internet!

Bell Canada and other big telecom companies can now freely impose usage-based billing on independent Internet Service Providers (indie ISPs) and YOU. Big Telecom companies are obviously trying to gouge consumers, control the Internet market, and ensure that consumers continue to subscribe to their television services.  

This means we’re looking at a future where ISPs will charge per byte, the way they do with smart phones. If we allow this to happen Canadians will have no choice but to pay more for less Internet.

This will crush innovative services, Canada’s digital competitiveness, and your wallet. 

We need to stand up for the Internet.

Sign the Stop The Meter petition at: http://StopTheMeter.ca 

Want to know more? Here’s the lowdown: 

This decision is a blow to consumer choice, to access, and to free expression. Independent Internet service providers (ISPs), such as TekSavvy, pay incumbent telecoms like Bell for access points in their networks. In applying usage-based billing (UBB) to these indie ISPs, the CRTC has allowed Bell to determine and limit how many gigabytes of usage their independent competitors can provide to their customers.

– This severely limits competition in the telecommunications market, which is bad for innovation and diversity of content.

– This also means that the cost will necessarily be passed down to you, the consumer. 

– Usage-based billing, or metering discriminates against certain forms of information insofar as it charges consumers more for content that requires the use of a large amount of gigabytes, such as audio and video.

– This also means that those who produce media-based art, and depend on the Internet to show the world their work, are less able to produce and disseminate their content freely. This means less innovation and more control of art, film, music, and other forms we may not yet know of!

Sign the petition and save the freest medium we have ever known (again!). Stop the Meter and save our net!

Read more at SaveOurNet.ca: http://saveournet.ca/content/what-does-usage-based-billing-mean-net-neutrality

Read more at OpenMedia.ca: http://openmedia.ca/blog/crtc-decision-all-bell-and-usage-based-billing-all

Read TV Versus The Internet by Steve Anderson: http://thetyee.ca/Mediacheck/2010/10/06/TVversusInternet/

Read more at CBC.ca: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2010/10/28/crtc-usage-based-billing-internet.html

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Happy Thanksgiving Canada

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Thanksgiving Canada 2010 - 2010 Canadian Thanks Giving

Observed by: Canada, United States

Type: National

Date: 2nd Monday in October (Canada), 4th Thursday in November (U.S.)

2009 date: October 12, 2009 (Canada); November 26, 2009 (U.S.)

2010 date: October 11, 2010 (Canada); November 25, 2010 (U.S.)

Celebrations: Spending Time with Family, feasting, religious practice

Thanksgiving Day in Canada has been celebrated since 1957, on the second Monday of October. It is a chance to give thanks for good harvest and other fortunes in the past year for the people. People have a day off work on this day, though perhaps religious in origin, Thanksgiving is identified as a secular holiday now. Many stores and other organizations and businesses are also closed on this day.

The Sky Has NOT Fallen

Even before the election results came in, I knew very little would change in Canada, despite all the doomsayers trumpeting.

Let’s face it, the views of the major cities  are totally out of synch with the rest of the country. and this in turn will be reflected in the makeup of our parliament. A stalemate will ultimately be the end result.

People too often fear change, without truly understanding what it is they actually fear. In the case of this election, I feel that a change is good, and even necessary.

The Liberals really need to rebuild their image and the country’s trust. This is what they as a party and we as a people get for trusting a used car sales-man as Prime Minister in the end.

Prime Minister Jean Chretien